Tuberculinum aviare-The avian mycobacterium- An Integrated Perspective And Its Scope In the Treatment Of COVID-19 Disease

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    Tuberculinum Aviare is prepared from Mycobacterium Avium. In 1895 Dr. Cartier reports treating cases presenting like influenza but which had grave symptoms and suspicious cough, successfully treated with Tuberculinum Aviare. Anshutz in “New, Old and Forgotten Remedies” summarizes anecdotal cases of influenzal bronchitis effectively treated by Tuberculinum Aviare. Influenzal bronchitis is accompanied by an incessant cough and by grave general symptoms. There is more frequently acute than passive, obstructive and dyspneic congestion. It is a remedy of long-lasting action, capable in certain cases of modifying the organism, and of bracing a constitution which has become enfeebled from the effects of influenza. It is suitable for complicated respiratory viral diseases like influenza and measles. C.E. Whiiler in 1957, finds Tuberculinum Av of real value as a prophylactic for this susceptibility to germs of catarrh especially when continuous infection is prevalent for people constantly exposed to it. In contemporary literature Hypersensitive Pneumonitis caused by Mycobacterium Avium- “hot-lung disease”- has striking similarities with COVID19 including ground-glass opacities on CT scan. In-vitro experiments have found cells infected with mycobacterium avium showing resistance to influenza infection. In Passerines, an inverse relationship between the prevalence of M. avium infection and Avian influenza viruses is observed while the co-infection with both organisms in a single bird is rare. These observations and the striking similarity between Mycobacterium Avium Disease and COVID19, lead us to hypothesize that Mycobacterium Avium (Tuberculinum Aviare) is homoeopathically indicated and has a scope in treating critical cases of COVID19, and also to examine and test the scope of this remedy as a prophylaxis and to initiate in-vitro studies and vaccine-related research co-using mycobacterium-avium.
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